Appreciating Diversity Film Series

The Appreciating Diversity Film Series is a collaborative program of the Piedmont Appreciating Diversity Committee, DiversityWorks, and the Piedmont Chapter of the League of Women Voters. We endeavor to show six documentary films a year, each followed by some form of community dialogue. The mission of the Appreciating Diversity Film Series is:

to bring powerful documentaries that examine issues of diversity to community audiences.

We aim to provide a venue that stimulates community dialogue about institutionalized power imbalances, broadens awareness, challenges assumptions, and encourages attendees to work towards a more just world. Check out our upcoming films below and on our Calendar. Our films are always free.

Rape on the Night Shift

Rape on the Night Shift -woman holds microphoneRape on the Night Shift is a powerful look at the impact of sexual abuse on some of the most vulnerable women in the work force- immigrant women working as night janitors. Despite the risk of losing their jobs or being deported, women went on camera to break their silence. This documentary continues the #MeToo conversation beyond the worlds of Hollywood, media and politics.
 
Following each screening, hear journalists and producers involved with this film discuss this issue further.
 
 
In Piedmont @ 7 pm, March 7th, 2018

Ellen Driscoll Theater / 325 Highland Ave (at Oakland Ave)/Piedmont
Doors open, light refreshments @ 6:30 pm
Film at 7:00 pm, followed by panel & discussion

In Oakland @ 3 pm, March 10, 2018

The New Parkway Theater / 474 24th Street (btw Telegraph & Broadway) / Oakland
Film at 3 PM, followed by panel & discussion

The House We Live In and Arc of Justice

AFDS will celebrate the days leading up to Martin Luther King's birthday with two films that focus on the ways American institutions and policies advantage some groups at the expense of others.

The House We Live InThe House We Live In focuses on immigration and housing, and shows how American laws and policies have resulted in dramatically different treatment for whites and all other races. For example, post WWII red-lining limited investment in cities, at the same time that people of color were discriminated against in suburban housing. The film describes how these policies have affected wealth disparities between whites and people of color today.


The Arc of JusticeThe Arc of Justice traces the path of black farmers in Georgia, who, after the Civil Rights Movement, formed a community land trust to cooperatively farm more than 6,000 acres. They fight through opposition to their building low cost housing, crippling drought, and then denial of government loans that their white neighbors received. Come see how their lawsuit against the government demonstrates the importance of our rule of law.

In Piedmont @ 7 pm, January 11, 2018

Ellen Driscoll Theater / 325 Highland Ave (at Oakland Ave)/Piedmont
Doors open, light refreshments @ 6:30 pm
Film at 7:00 pm, followed by panel discussion

In Oakland @ 3 pm, January 13, 2018

The New Parkway Theater / 474 24th Street (btw Telegraph & Broadway) / Oakland
Film at 3 PM, followed by panel discussion

Growing Up Trans: An Intimate Conversation (with Transgender Children, Their Families, Friends and Doctors)

"The triumph... is that it makes viewers feel the struggle, suffering and some of the victories for the children and their parents even as it provides a world of information on coming-of-age transgender." -- Baltimore Sun

Growing Up TransIn the opening scene of the documentary film, Growing Up Trans, 9-year-old Lia Hegarty is on a surfboard splashing in the ocean. From the sun, sea and her gleeful little-girl calls as she catches a wave, the sound and images move to her bedroom, where she declares, "I am transgender. I was born male, and I identify female. But I like to say I'm a girl stuck in a boy's body."

Lia is one of eight youngsters featured in the Appreciating Diversity Film Series' December screening of Growing Up Trans. Lia says she "transitioned" when she was "6 or 7" to being "more of a girl." Now, she says, "I'm almost completely female." This year, she adds, "I changed my name officially. So now, I've changed my name, my clothes, my room and my pronouns. That's really all you need except for the fifth one that I still need: surgery and medicine to help me look like a girl."

Though Lia's statement about her identity is disarmingly straightforward, Growing Up Trans examines the complexities in the situations facing transgender youth. Filmmakers Miri Navasky and Karen O'Connor go deep inside the lives of these children, their families and friends, tracing their path toward gender identity. Told from the perspective of parents, doctors, and most revealing of all, the kids themselves, the documentary takes a powerful look at this new generation, exploring the medical possibilities, struggles and choices transgender kids and their families face today. The film gives viewers a chance to observe not only how amazingly self aware and articulate the youngsters are, but also how easily accepted they appear to be by their young friends. The experiences of these real people provide a striking contrast with the media obsession with celebrity, abuse or bathrooms.

Chief among the decisions facing these families is whether to take "puberty blockers" that delay an individual's maturation to give them more time before making more permanent decisions about hormone therapies, and then, whether to take hormone therapy. We observe the doctors' conversations with their patients and their families, and come away with a greater understanding of the thoughtful struggles they engage in while trying to determine the best path forward.

The Appreciating Diversity Film Series will host two screenings of Growing Up Trans. The film will be followed by a panel discussion of parents and transgender youth in both Piedmont and Oakland.

In Piedmont @ 7 pm, Dec. 7, 2017

Ellen Driscoll Theater / 325 Highland Ave (at Oakland Ave)/Piedmont
Doors open, light refreshments @ 6:30 pm
Film at 7:00 pm, followed by panel discussion

In Oakland @ 3 pm, Dec. 9, 2017

The New Parkway Theater / 474 24th Street (btw Telegraph & Broadway) / Oakland
Film at 3 PM, followed by panel discussion