November 5, 2019 Election Phone Bank Information

November 5, 2019 Election Phone Bank Information

 

 

County Boards of Elections

 

FRANKLIN  |  Delaware  |  Fairfield  |  Licking  |  Madison  |  Pickaway  |  Union

Directory of all Boards of Elections

Other phone numbers

Rides to the polls: 

COTA busses are free today.

Try calling your local party headquarters
FranklinCounty Ds: 614-221-6563
FranklinCounty Rs: 614-224-3939

The President is NOT up for election today.

Ohio's presidential primary is on March 17, 2020. The presidential election is on November 3, 2020.



PROCESS

CANDIDATES/ISSUES

SECURITY

 

Poll Hours

Find Polling Place

Verifying Registration

I am not in the poll book, but I should be / improperly removed

ID

Moved

College voting

Changed Name

Absentee Voting

Track mail-in ballot

Are absentee ballots really counted?

Provisional Ballots

Paper Ballots

Felons' Voting Rights

Jailed persons' voting rights

On-line Voter Registration

Voting Assistance

Medical Emergency

Rides to Polls

What is on the ballot?

Sample Ballot

How can I learn more about candidates & issues?

Judicial Candidate Information

Judicial Candidate - Political Party Info

How do I declare or change my party affiliation? 

When is the presidential primary/election?

Can I photograph my ballot?

What is the No Campaigning area? What are the flags for?

Who is allowed to "observe"?

Someone was acting inappropriately or trying to intimidate

 

BALLOT ISSUES

LEVIES, BONDS, AND MILLS

Issue 10: Renewal tax levy for Franklin County Children Services board

Other area ballot issues

 Levy vs. Bond issue

 What is a mill?

 Different kinds of levies

ABOUT THE LEAGUE

 Helpful Phone Numbers

LWV Nonpartisan Policy

Can I join the League?

 



Poll Hours

6:30 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.  Anyone in line to vote at 7:30 p.m. is permitted to vote.

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Polling Place

  • Click on the blue Voter Search box, part way down the page on the left. 
  • Enter house number, street name, zip code, and hit search.
  • You can access polling place location, map, and sample ballot.

Example:  200 E. 7th Street
House number: 200
Street: Seventh (not E., not Street, not 7)

FRANKLIN  |  Delaware  |  Fairfield  |  Licking  |  Madison  |  Pickaway  |  Union

Directory of all Boards of Elections

Note: The process differs on different counties' websites.  Check "Boards of Elections Cheat Sheet" in your training materials.

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Verifying Registration 

 

  • On Franklin County Board of Elections site, click on the red Menu button at the top of the page.
    • Under Voters, click on My Registration.
    • Enter first name, last name, house number, and birth year, and hit the login button.
    • If the person is registered at that address, their name will come up, and you can access a sample ballot and their polling place.

Note: The process differs on different counties' websites.  Check "Boards of Elections Cheat Sheet" in your training materials.

FRANKLIN  |  Delaware  |  Fairfield  |  Licking  |  Madison  |  Pickaway  |  Union

Directory of all Boards of Elections

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I am not in the poll book, but I should be / improperly removed

Are you in the correct polling place?  If so, vote a provisional ballot today.  Tomorrow, contact the Board of Elections and talk to them about it.

If not, go to your correct polling place and vote there.  A provisional ballot will not count if you're not in the right polling place.

Anyone who wants to vote a provisional ballot must be permitted to do so.

Under an agreement between the American Civil Liberties Union and the A. Philip Randolph Institute of Ohio — two groups that sued over Ohio's law in 2016 — and the secretary of state's office, voters in Ohio who have been purged can still cast a provisional ballot at their polling place through 2022. 

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ID

 

 

Acceptable IDs:

  • An Ohio driver’s license or state ID card. The card must be current (not expired), but it can have an old address.
  • The new temporary Ohio driver's license.
  • A U.S. Military ID with your name and photo (address not required).
  • A government ID with your name, current address, and photo.
  • An original or copy of one of the following current documents that shows your name and current address:  utility bill (including cell phone bill), bank statement, pay stub, college/university document, government check, or other government document. The document must have a date within one year of Election Day to be accepted as current. This must be a paper bill; you can't just show a picture of it on your phone.
  • College documents: An ID that has the correct name and current address of the voter, as it appears in the poll book, and is no more than one year old. Other college documents count as "government documents" if they come from a a public college, whether or not in Ohio, such as letters, grade reports, transcripts, etc.
  • Ohio Hunting/Fishing License
  • A speeding ticket.
  • Ohio License to Carry a Concealed Handgun, if it is less than 1 year old.
  • If you do not have any of the above, you may use the last 4 digits of your Social Security number. You will have to vote a provisional ballot, but it will be counted so long as the number matches your voter registration.

NOT acceptable IDs:

  • Driver's license or photo ID issued by a state other than Ohio.
  • Social Security card (although the last 4 digits only can be used on provisional or absentee ballot)
  • Birth certificate
  • Passport, UNLESS it has your current address on it.
  • Any registration notice or document from the Board of Elections.

graphic showing acceptable IDs in Ohio

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Moved

 

 

 

Within Ohio:   Always vote at the polling place for your new/current address.  If you were registered in Ohio and moved, either within the county or to a different county, and if you re-registered at your new address by October 8, you vote a regular ballot at your new precinct.

If you moved within your same voting location (e.g.,  from one apartment to another within the same building) and your ID is good, vote a regular ballot but fill out a change of address form.

If you moved to a  new precinct but did NOT re-register at your new address, you will vote a provisional ballot at your new precinct.  You will also be given a change of address form, so you'll be all set for next time.

This includes students at Ohio colleges who are registered to vote in Ohio.

If the student is registered but did not request an absentee ballot to vote at home, he or she can vote a provisional ballot at their new polling place and fill out a change of address form. This will change their permanent address to their address at school.  If the student moves next year, s/he will need to update their voter registration again.

  • College documents: An ID that has the correct name and current address of the voter, as it appears in the poll book, and is no more than one year old. Other college documents count as "government documents" if they come from a a public college, whether or not in Ohio, such as letters, grade reports, transcripts, etc.

Moved from a different state?  You must have registered to vote in Ohio by the deadline to vote here (30 days prior to the election).

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Changed Name

 

 

If you have changed your name, but forgot to update your voter registration, you can vote a regular ballot this time, but ONLY IF you bring in legal proof of your name change (such as a marriage license or court order), as well as another form of ID that shows your current address. The election official will help you fill out a "change of name" form, and you'll be all set for the next election.  If you don't bring legal documentation, you'll vote a provisional ballot.

If you also moved to a different address, see instructions above, under MOVED.  You will have to vote a provisional ballot, even if you moved within the same precinct, because you also changed your name.

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Absentee Voting

 

 

The deadline to request an absentee ballot was Saturday at noon.  If you already have applied for an absentee ballot, your voted ballot must be received by your Board of Elections before 7:30 tonight. It is too late to mail it. (Must be postmarked the day before the election.)

Take your ballot to the Board office, NOT to a polling place.  The Franklin County Board of Elections is at 1700 Morse Road, just east of Karl Road.  This is where early voting has taken place for the last several years.  Before that, it was a Kohl's store.

If you requested an absentee ballot but did not receive it or did not return it, you may vote a provisional ballot at your polling place. It will be counted if the Board has not received your voted absentee ballot.

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Track mail-in ballot

You can track the progress of your absentee ballot.  

On election day, use the Menu at the top to select My Registration.  Fill that out, click login, and the caller's absentee ballot tracking appears at the bottom of the page.

Note: The process differs on different counties' websites.  Check "Boards of Elections Cheat Sheet" in your training materials.

FRANKLIN  |  Delaware  |  Fairfield  |  Licking  |  Madison  |  Pickaway  |  Union

Directory of all Boards of Elections

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Are absentee ballots really counted?

Yes. They are the first ballots counted after the polls close at 7:30.  In fact, when you hear news reports with projections of the results soon after the polls close with "zero precincts reporting," it is the early and absentee ballots that are being reported. Absentee ballots that arrive after Election Day (postmarked the day before the election) and authenticated provisional ballots are counted and included in the final vote tally that is announced 10 days after the election.

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Provisional Ballots

 

 

 

There is a Provisional Voter Hotline (614-525-6455) that voters can use.

Provisional ballots are paper ballots a person may be required to use to vote – instead of getting to vote on the machines – if there is some question about the voter's identity.

The main reasons you'd have to vote provisionally are:

  • you don't have proper ID,
  • you haven't changed your address (but you're in the right polling place), or
  • you requested an absentee ballot but decided to vote at your polling place instead.

A provisional ballot has all the candidates and issues that you would vote if you were using the machines.  There is also identification information that the voter MUST fill out completely and sign. 

Once the Board of Elections processes the information provided, and it knows that you are registered and in the right polling place, the vote is counted.  This is one of the reasons why election results are not official until 10 days after an election.

If a provisional voter has no ID and refuses to add the last 4 digits of their SS number to the required paperwork, they have 7 days to bring a good ID to the Board of Elections. Otherwise their provisional ballot can not be counted.

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Paper Ballots

 

Anybody who doesn't want to vote on the machines can request a paper regular ballot instead.  If the lines are too long, or if there is a problem with the machines, voters must be reminded that they can vote on paper ballots.

The difference between paper and provisional ballots is that paper ballots go directly into the secure box of voted ballots that get counted right away.  Provisional ballots are set aside until the voter's eligibility can be confirmed.

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Felons' Voting Rights

Felons can vote in Ohio, if they are no longer in prison and are registered to vote.  An otherwise qualified person convicted of a felony may register and vote while on probation or parole or after completing his or her prison sentence.

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Jailed persons' voting rights

Many people mistakenly believe they lose their right to vote while they are detained in jail or while they are awaiting trial. Anyone who is a resident of Ohio, not detained for a felony and meets other eligibility requirements can vote. This includes the thousands of Ohio residents currently detained in one of 72 county jails and who have not yet been convicted of a felony. Call the ACLU of Ohio for assistance: (216) 472-2200.

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Can I register to vote on line?

It's too late to register to vote in today's election.  But, yes, you can register online on the Ohio Secretary of State's website: https://olvr.sos.state.oh.us/

You may vote in the next election so long as you register not less than 30 days prior to that election.             

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Voting Assistance

 

Any voter may have help in voting, if they want it, from two poll workers of different parties OR from a person of the voter's choice, except their employer or labor union officer. 

If the voter's assistant/s physically touch the screen or the paper (i.e., they don't just talk to the voter) then the assistant/s must sign a form saying that they helped to the best of their ability and that they will not disclose how the voter voted.

Voting machines have adaptations so voters with disabilities can vote a secret ballot. Voting machines also have an audible ballot option for people with visual impairments.  (The poll workers will explain how to use the machine).

Curbside voting allows a voter who is unable to access to polling location to vote a paper ballot from his or her vehicle.  The voter has the driver or another person go into the polling place and alert the poll workers that they need to vote curbside.  Two pollworkers, one from each major part, will come out and work with the voter.

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Rides to the polls

COTA is free on Election Day to assist people in getting to the polls: 

https://www.cota.com/trip-planner

Also try:

Franklin County Ds: 614-221-6563

Franklin County Rs: 614-224-3939

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Medical Emergency 

The voter must be hospitalized or have a minor child who is hospitalized.  The procedure is complicated: 

The voter fills out and signs a Hospitalized Absentee Ballot Request Form (available from hospital social workers or by calling the Board of Elections). The form must be received by the Board of Elections by 3 p.m. on Election Day.

The Board will send 2 poll workers (D and R) to the hospital to assist the voter. The poll workers deliver the voted ballots to the Board of Elections, where they will be counted, even if they arrive after the polls have closed. Or the voter can ask the Board to give your unmarked ballot to a designated family member who will deliver it to the voter in the hospital and return it to the Board of Elections.

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What is on the ballot?

In this general election, voters will be electing the following:

  • City Councils
  • Township and Village Offices
  • School Board
  • Municipal Court races

There are no statewide ballot issues this time.

Franklin County has a renewal levy in support of Franklin County Children 

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Sample Ballot

Sample ballots can be found on Board of Elections web sites, once a polling place has been found.  Many BofE also have an "interactive" sample ballot, which allows people to mark their choices online and print out their choices.

The League's www.Vote411.org also allows people to make selections on line and text or email themselves their choices.

Neither of these casts an actual vote.  There is no on-line voting in Ohio.

FRANKLIN  |  Delaware  |  Fairfield  |  Licking  |  Madison  |  Pickaway  |  Union

Directory of all Boards of Elections

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How can I learn more about candidates & issues?

http://www.Vote411.org

Type in your address to see your races and ballot issues.

Making selections on Vote411 is NOT VOTING. There is no way to vote via computer or phone in Ohio.

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Judicial Candidate Information

http://www.Vote411.org

Additional information may be available on Judicial Votes Count, a new website from the League of Women Voters and its partners. It has good information about judicial offices and candidates.

www.judicialvotescount.org, then click on "Who's Running for Judge?"

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Judicial Candidates - Parties

  • In the General Election, judges run on a nonpartisan ballot, meaning that their party affiliation is not listed by their names.
  • In the Primary Election, you can tell what party the judicial candidates belong to, because each party is selecting its nominee to run against the nominee from the other party/s. So, you will see that judicial Candidate A is running against Candidate B in the Democratic primary, and judicial Candidate Y is running against Candidate Z in the Republican primary, but - in the November election - the party affiliations won't be listed for Candidate B vs. Candidate Y.
  • If a caller wants to know the judicial candidates' party affiliation, the best source is the county parties' recommended ballots. In Franklin County, those are Republican and Democratic.

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How do I declare or change my party affiliation? 

  • Selecting/changing your party happens only at Primary Elections.
  • At a Primary, you are asked which kind of ballot you want: Republican, Democratic, or Issues Only. (Sometimes there are also third party ballots available.)  You may choose any ballot.
  • Choosing a party's ballot at the Primary makes you a member of that party.
  • You can change your party affiliation at any/every primary election. 
  • At a General Election, you may vote for whomever you want, no matter whom you voted for in the Primary.

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Issue 10: Renewal tax levy for Franklin County Children Services board

 

Issue 10, if approved will renew a 3.1 mill property tax levy providing funds for Franklin County Children Services (FCCS)

League Explanation

The proposed 10-year renewal of the levy does not increase property taxes for homeowners, but continues support for FCCS at its current level which amounts to $85 per $100,000 of valuation. Defeat of this levy would decrease operating revenue by 42% and require a reduction in services provided by FCCS. Serving more than 30,000 children and their families annually, FCCS is mandated by Ohio Revised Code to investigate any allegation of child abuse or neglect.  FCCS also provides protective services, helps parents resolve family problems by referring them to community based programs, and places children in temporary foster care, with relatives, in residential care, or in permanent adoptive homes when necessary.

Arguments Made in Support of Issue 10

  • The renewal levy will not raise taxes but only continues the current funding of FCCS: FCCS has exercised fiscal responsibility by carefully studying its anticipated needs. FCCS intervenes and provides vital services to children at a time in their development that not only benefits them and their families but also benefits the community long term.

 Arguments Made in Opposition to Issue 10

  • Property taxes are a burden for people on fixed incomes.  A better approach would be for the state to replace the FCCS property tax with an increase in state funding.

(The League has no position on Issue 10.)

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Other area ballot issues

PDF iconClick here for list

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What's the difference between a levy and a bond issue?

A ballot issue with a levy is a request for funds to be raised immediately by taxing the value of property.  In FranklinCounty, levies are used to provide funds for schools, COTA, Central Ohio Area Agency on Aging, Franklin County Children Services, Franklin County Board of Developmental Disabilities, etc.  Levies are expressed in "mills," or the percentage of property value to be taxed.

A ballot issue with a bond issue is a request for permission to essentially take out a loan to pay for capital improvements (buildings, roads, other infrastructure, etc.).  The money is received up front from the sale of bonds to investors and paid back by the taxpayers, with interest, over time.  Although bonds end up costing more, they also spread out the costs to people in the future who will be the users of the new school or bridge.  Ballot issues are expressed in the total dollar amount to be borrowed.

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What is a mill?

Millage is a way to express property tax rates.

A mill is equal to 1/1000th of a dollar.  The taxable value of property in Ohio is 35% of the value as appraised by the county auditor.  So, if you see a ballot issue asking for a 2 mill levy, and your house is worth $100,000 (according to the county auditor, not your realtor), the tax being asked for is:

$100,000 (value of your house) x .35 (to find the taxable value) x .002 (which is 2 one-thousandths of a dollar) = $70 per year.

Some counties have slick calculators where you look by school district or plug in your address:

Franklin Co.: http://apps.franklincountyauditor.com/LevyEstimator

Delaware Co: http://delaware-auditor-ohio.manatron.com/TaxEstimatorSite.aspx

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New, Renewal, or Replacement levies

New levies are just that: a new property tax.

A renewal levy means that the tax you owe for this levy will remain the same, even if your property value has increased since the last time this levy was enacted.

A replacement levy may sound the same, but it will almost always cost more.  Many times, a replacement levy will ask for a higher levy amount.  However, even if it asks for the exact same millage as the expiring levy it replaces, it will likely cost more because it will be based on the (almost always) increased value of your property since the last time the levy was enacted.

So, a ballot issue that renews a 2 mill levy from the year 2010, when your home was worth $100,000, will cost pretty much the same as it did in the year 2010, even if your house is now worth $200,000.  If the agency asks for a 2 mill replacement levy, it will cost more because it is based on your property now being worth $200,000.

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Can I take a picture of my ballot?

No. It's against the law to take a picture of your ballot. This is to ward against someone intimidating/paying a voter to vote a certain way and demanding proof of that vote.  

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What is the No Campaigning area? What are the flags for?

 

 

No electioneering/campaigning is allowed within 100 feet of the voting location. Flags are typically placed outside the voting location at the 100-foot mark. Electioneering includes distributing campaign literature and wearing/displaying political t-shirts, hats, buttons. It also includes discussions of a political nature in the polling location.

More details can be found in poll worker manual on page 48.

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Who is allowed to "observe"?

 

 

Official observers (those allowed inside the polling places) must be registered Ohio voters and certified by a party and must take an oath agreeing to abide by the rules.

State rules bar “impeding, interfering with, or disrupting the election in some manner” or “intimidating, harassing, or attempting to influence voters or precinct election officials.”

The regulations stress: “Observers may not serve as enforcers of the laws nor act as advocates for voters before the precinct election officials.”

Observers may not challenge a person's right to vote. A voter may be challenged only by a precinct election official or the voting location manager and only for certain reasons.

More details can be found in poll worker manual on page 45.

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Someone was acting inappropriately or trying to intimidate

1) Speak to the poll worker called the Voting Location Manager or Presiding Judge

2) Call your county sheriff

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LWV Nonpartisan Policy

The League of Women Voters is nonpartisan. We never support or oppose political parties or candidates.

We do take positions on some issues, after our members have studied and come to consensus on them.

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Can I join the League?

Yes! The League is open to all men and women.  You can join online at www.lwvcols.org.  Or give us your name, phone number, street address, and email, and someone will contact you soon.

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HELPFUL PHONE NUMBERS

 

 

 

 

 

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FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF ELECTIONS

 1700 Morse Road, just east of Karl Road          

 614-525-3100

SECRETARY OF STATE

614-466-2585 (Elections Division)

PROVISIONAL VOTER HOTLINE

(614-525-6455) 

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS

614-837-1089 Columbus LWVMC

614-469-1505 LWVOhio

www.Vote411.org

CHANNEL 10 PHONE BANK

614-469-10TV   (614-469-1088)

Or toll free at 1-855-746-10TV

 

FRANKLIN  |  Delaware  |  Fairfield  |  Licking  |  Madison  |  Pickaway  |  Union

Directory of all Boards of Elections

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